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Chrysocolla

chrysocolla

Name: Chrysocolla
Color(s): Green, blue with brown-white-black streak
Mineral Information: Copper silicate
Chemical Make-up: CuSi3.2H2O
Hardness: 2 – 4
Where they are found: Czech Republic, Israel, England, Congo, and the United States. In the U.S. Chrysocolla is found in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Pennsylvania.
About Stone: Chrysocolla, the king of carbonate copper gemstones, is an alluring, vivid blue-green color and is often mistaken for turquoise because they share many visual similarities. It can often be found intermingled with malachite, turquoise and azurite, creating a wonderful mixed gemstone known as eilat stone. Legend has it that eilat stone was originally mined in King Solomon’s mines in Africa. The rich, vibrant blue and green colors of chrysocolla are reminiscent of looking down upon the earth’s surface from space.

The name chrysocolla was first used to describe the stone by Theophrastus, a Greek philosopher and botanist, in 315 B.C. The word was derived from the Greek words chrysos, meaning gold, and kola, meaning glue, referencing the fact that chrysocolla was employed from the earliest times by goldsmiths as an ingredient for solder, called santerna by the Romans, to weld gold pieces together. This fancy gemstone has indeed inspired creativity in many artists, whether they were ancient goldsmiths using it as solder, Renaissance painters grinding it as pigment for paint or modern jewelry designer-artists including it within their florid designs.

For thousands of years chrysocolla has been known throughout the world as a stone of calming reconciliation and reassurance. In ancient Egypt, it was called the “wise stone” because it shielded and encouraged the mind during negotiations. Those who wore it generally came up with clever compromises and resolutions. This stone also has the ability to help people who are violent to become more sensitive and tolerant which is why, as an ambassador, Cleopatra wore chrysocolla jewelry everywhere she went.

This stone lends itself well to opulence. Nero was a Roman Emperor and well-known patron of the green faction of ancient Rome. These ancient factions were split into four colors: red, white, blue and green and were elite clubs that people felt loyalty to above all others. They would have many competitions, such as chariot races, and would do anything to ensure that their club would win and be proven superior. The green faction was the most dominant club, so when Nero was to take part in a race as a charioteer, he dusted the circus arena with ground green chrysocolla powder instead of using the customary sand.

Chrysocolla can be found wherever large copper deposits occur, most notably in Africa, Mexico and the state of Arizona. Apache chrysocolla from the state of Arizona is a mixture of chrysocolla, turquoise, jasper, lapis, malachite and quartz crystal minerals. The history of Apache chrysocolla being used as a stone of gentle healing coincides with the history of other cultures. Legends originating in Far East places such as Tibet and Africa also tell of healings through the use of chrysocolla. It has often been called multi-colored turquoise and, until recently, was not considered a gemstone in its own right until it was cited as a semiprecious gem rock. Then it became a favored stone for jewelry symbolizing prosperity, luck and fortitude.

Zodiac Association: Sagittarius
Metaphysical Properties: A grounding, balancing and stabilizing gemstone that helps decrease emotional heartbreak. Helps you find inner strength in stressful times, & promotes physical vitality. It promotes powerful experiences when used at the third eye.

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